Mom, My Teacher is Dyslexic

by Rich on May 1, 2012 · 3 comments

Rocky Perry wrote his first book back in 2009 while he was studying Early Childhood Education at Dalton State College. He has always tried to do the things that are hardest for him. He learned to read and write later than most people due to his Dyslexia, which was diagnosed with in the early eighties. Writing a book, like getting his degree, presented some unique challenges. This first book was written using Dragon Naturally Speaking speech to text software. He did finish the book and when he looked back at all the things hel earned from the experience, he knew he had to keep writing.

 

In the early eighties I was diagnosed with Dyslexia.  It wasn’t until sixth grade that I learned to read.  Most every book I read before thirty was an audio book and school was always a huge struggle.  At thirty six, I am a college graduate, a teacher, author of several books, and a father of three great kids.  I am doing the best I can.  Dyslexia is still a struggle.  I give a lot of credit to people who have helped me along the way, and of course technology.  Without technology I am certain I would not have made it through high school, much less any of the other endeavors I have accomplished in my life.

This blog is a message to all those parents and people out there who are dealing with the life long struggle of Dyslexia.  I have spent my whole life Dyslexic and know firsthand how difficult it can make accomplishing things that others take for granted as easy.  I like to use the words “brain fatigue” for people who do not live with the condition full time.  Brain fatigue can be a huge road block.  Even more so than the misunderstanding and uncertainty that the disability causes in the language processing part of the mind.  Being confused is never as hard as just not having the strength to continue on.  I am very thankful for the technological development of colored lenses.  It helps relieve this brain fatigue that stops so many of us from enjoying a good book or doing school work.

Rocky Perry's Book Cover

We have to do everything we can to help aid all those who deal with Dyslexia.  I had help, but others do not.  I have a friend here in Tennessee that is also Dyslexic.  He was diagnosed about the same time as myself, but did not get the same help nor does he have access to the same technology.  Most of all, he did not have the same support from parents and friends that I have had over the years.  He did not make it out of primary school, cannot read, and struggles just to make his way in life.  Remember to be considerate, raise awareness, and fund and support new technology that helps those with challenges in life that are out of their hands.  Dyslexia can be a gift and gives those of us with it a unique insight into the world, but it can also be fatiguing.  Lend a hand.

I talk more about my experiences and what you can do for your child or yourself in school in my new book on education reform: Self Evident: Education Reform. Available on Amazon.

More About Rocky Perry:

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Keith Rispin May 21, 2012 at 3:31 pm

Nice blog post. Your title caught my attention.

Although I am not Dyslexic, I did/do have a visual processing issue coupled with a non existent working memory which made reading very difficult and therefore my grade school life a living hell. My early grade school experience was in the 70′s when someone like me was just diagnosed as “dumb as a post”

When I first started teaching, I would have never “come out” as someone with a developmental or learning disability but now with 15 years under my belt I will share this on occasion when the situation warrants it.

Overall it would seem to have a positive effect, especially with kids who are struggling academically themselves but I am not sure it is really of any benefit. Anyhow, love the title.

Cheers,
Keith Rispin

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Rich June 2, 2012 at 7:23 pm

Hi Keith – thanks for the comment and sharing your story!

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