Group in Princeton, NJ forms Decoding Dyslexia to Raise Awareness and Understanding

by Rich on February 29, 2012 · 4 comments

A story came out on NJ.com Monday about a group of parents from Princeton, NJ, who have banded together to help spread awareness and understanding about dyslexia.  The group is called, Decoding Dyslexia, and it is made up of a number of parents who all have similar stories of frustration.

Here’s a quick quote from the article to help paint a picture of their agony.

“They had been meeting for years in local coffee shops to discuss how their children weren’t reading anything by first grade, couldn’t spell their names, couldn’t remember sounds, couldn’t match rhyming words, couldn’t distinguish left from right, didn’t have a dominant left or right hand, couldn’t get their shoes on the correct feet let alone tie the laces — and they weren’t getting support in their classrooms.”

One of their goals is to educate folks on the common misconceptions of dyslexia.  One such misconception is that dyslexics read backwards or will reverse letters that look similar.  The group stresses that dyslexia is much more complex, and help needs to be administered to children early.

Treating and even recognizing dyslexia in children is challenging beyond belief.  Kids who suffer from symptoms associated with dyslexia don’t always have the vocabulary to explain what they are seeing on paper, and why it’s difficult for them to follow the words and/or numbers on a page.  Uneducated teachers may sometimes write off students as slow, not realizing that they need to consider more focused help or an aid for symptoms associated with dyslexia.

 “Dyslexia affects your ability to read,” concluded Bray. “If you can’t effectively read you cannot be prepared for college and a career. We have to address this issue now, when they’re young. Because otherwise we’re going to take upwards of 20 percent of the population and effectively exclude them from those preparations.”

The above statement is powerful and incredibly terrifying.  To think that 20 percent of our children aren’t receiving the help they need to prepare for their education and career is very scary and it’s something that just can not happen.  More groups like Decoding Dyslexia need to be formed, and awareness must continue to be spread.

You can check out the full article HERE and view the Decoding Dyslexia Facebook HERE.

If you believe your child may be suffering from symptoms associated with dyslexia, please CLICK HERE to take our quick and free 7 Question Survey.  ChromaGen Vision may be able to help!

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Anoop March 16, 2012 at 9:11 am

Dear Chromagen ,

We from Malaysia would like to conduct a seminar amongst Optometrists and Pediatricians for creating awareness of Chromagen’s Lens for Dyslexia for which we are trying to locate KOL (Key Opinion Leaders) to visit Malaysia and help us do a 2 day seminar.

Do revert with suggestions if any of KOL
Thanks
Much Obliged
Anoop Raj
+6016 37 67 417

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Sue Kerrigan April 9, 2012 at 3:24 pm

i teach dyslexic children, in a school for dyslexic children. The truth is, that once you know how to teach children to read (decoding our language with phonics) and with a multisensory approach, it is not difficult to teach dyslexic children. I started a teaching degree in the UK. However, i was not taught how to teach kids to learn (im shocked and saddened by this fact, still) so I left and took private instruction to feel confident about teaching children this essential lifeskill. I am dyslexic, learning phonics was an amazing revelation to me. i both love and hate dyslexia, i lovehow it has made me creative, i hate how it makes me feel stupid. I teach the children they can win by using their assets to overcome dyslexia. Im on twitter @letmelearn.

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